2016’s Top TV: A final round-up

After giving Planet Earth 2 and Mr Robot their own posts, here’s the rest of my favourite TV series from last year.

WESTWORLD – “The Original”/”The Bicameral Mind”

westworld
Copyright: HBO.

Westworld is an ambitious sci-fi western which HBO hopes will be its next Game of Thrones. With a similarly-enormous budget, it tells the story of the hosts and owners of a futuristic theme park which the richest people in the world visit to indulge their imaginations and play around in a sprawling area full of old-timey saloons, dusty plains and red cliffs that look like they’ve been lifted from a classic western.

Guests can kill and cuddle with any host they want because all the hosts are actually incredibly-lifelike robots, each with their own programmed routine that they play out day after day, with limited amounts of improvisation allowed when interacting with the wealthy wannabe-westerners that meet them. The technology for their ‘thoughts’ and the scripts for their storylines are worked on by a team of behind-the-scenes boffins including Bernard (Jeremy Wright), who uses his fascination with the intricacies of human behaviour to make the hosts as human as robotly possible.

Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) is stuck in a damsel-in-distress role, spending all of her days getting raped, rescued, killed, repaired and reset, ready to face a new day of trauma. Maeve (Thandie Newton) is the madam in charge of a group of whores who ply their trade at the saloon of a small town at the entrance of the park. She watches as the guests indulge their basest desires and gets caught up in the bank robbery that happens without fail every afternoon.

Meanwhile, Logan (Ben Barnes) shows his co-worker William (Jimmi Simpson) around the park and William is appalled by the way that Logan treats the hosts like expendable characters in a videogame, but Logan argues that that’s the entire point of the park: to treat the humanoid hosts as badly as he wants with no consequences. There’s also a nameless regular visitor wandering around trying to find a deeper level to the park’s theatrics because he’s become bored with the standard storylines.

It all kicks off when a new update that allows the hosts to use memories of their earlier experiences to improve their improv has unexpected side-effects – Dolores starts vividly reliving the horrors of her past and Maeve grapples with a new unsettling feeling of deja-vu. The park’s owner and co-creator Dr Robot Ford (Sir Anthony Hopkins, clearly relishing the meaty material he’s been given) is working on a grand new narrative for his park and won’t let a minor technological hiccup like this stop him from completing it.

The hosts are becoming self-aware and sentient and furious, and their mysterious, menacing creator, perhaps unsurprisingly, has a bit of a god complex. Clearly, everything’s going to go horribly wrong. But how? And when?

The first season of Westworld was very promising. Its first episode was immediately engaging, immaculately-directed and exceptionally well-performed, introducing its intricate world in a way that was entertaining and fairly easy to understand. The show could easily become the mega-hit that HBO is hoping it’ll be.

Wood and Newton are both outstanding as the hosts who deal with their increasing awareness in very different ways and try to get their bearings as their pasts mix with their present. It should be no surprise that a show created by Jonathan Nolan, who also wrote Memento, has a plot that pivots around problems with recollection and unreliable memories.

The show tries to balance the fun crowd-pleasing cowboy adventures in the park with the sinister science and philosophical ‘What does it mean to be human?’ discussions in the cold glass offices of the park’s hidden headquarters. It’s a tricky mixture of moods but the soundtrack by Ramin Djawadi (working on this between seasons of Game of Thrones) expertly moves from barnstorming action to creepy contemplation and back again.

Westworld likes to keep its cards frustratingly close to its chest, which results in a lot of time mid-season where characters seem to be this close to revealing the answers to its many mysteries but then decide to be coy instead. Fortunately, the feature-length finale is full of so many big reveals and bombshells that change our understanding of what was going on that it practically demands a re-watch of the whole season. And there’ll be plenty of time to do that – the next episodes aren’t airing ’til 2018…

(Oh, and beware of spoilers and theories! I accidentally glanced at some fan-theories while reading reviews and comments about the show as it aired, then was annoyed and a little surprised when many of them – even ones that I dismissed for seeming too outlandish and unlikely – ended up being 100% accurate.)

BLACK MIRROR – “San Junipero”

black-mirror-san-junipero
Copyright: Netflix.

Another excellent sci-fi that uses technology to explore the darkest depths of humanity was a big hit this year. Charlie Brooker’s timely anthology returned to find more ways to make viewers pessimistic and paranoid about their iPhones. It’s one of the most original shows of the 21st century, its genius writing has attracted top talent both in front of and behind the camera, with big stars, directors and composers from the silver screen eager to be involved and doing incredible work, but it still feels odd to say that I was looking forward to it – is it possible to look forward to something that’s always so bleak?

Watching this can be a thoroughly unpleasant experience, a brutal punch to the stomach that leaves many who view it feeling drained, depressed and unable to even think of seeing the next episode until they’ve had a long break. This last quality makes it an odd choice for Netflix, which has shows that are tailor-made for a lengthy binge, but the streaming service became the show’s new home in 2016.

This was an experimental season, playing with expectations of what viewers expect from an episode of Black Mirror, taking its usual themes about the dangers of misused tech and applying them to different genres and styles. It incorporated the hatred-through-hashtags of a social media mob into a feature-length police procedural, used a virtual reality game to do a playful horror pastiche and explored the rapid evolution of military equipment in an episode that resembled a war movie.

Its first episode, a darkly-comic satire exploring a world where online ratings are applied to real people, was a good way to introduce the show to a global audience. Filmed in soft pastel colours that masked the script’s bite, with plenty of laugh-out-loud moments and an ending that’s bittersweet rather than bleak, it was a nicely-accessible ep that eased new viewers in and introduced them to Black Mirror‘s rather twisted view of the world without scaring them away.

The highlight of the season, and probably the entire series so far, was “San Junipero”, an  episode which came about after Brooker decided to mess with those who complained that his show about 21st-century-and-beyond Britain would now be too Americanised and different. He did this by writing an episode set in America. In the past.

It revolves around the romance between a shy tourist visiting a nightclub in the titular town and the confident girl she meets and falls in love with. A lot of time is spent establishing this unusual ’80s setting, the beautiful beaches and bright neon of the seaside paradise all alluringly-filmed by Gustav Danielsson and synthily-scored by Clint Mansell, and the relationship between its opposites-attract couple Kelly and Yorkie, played perfectly by Gugu Mbatha-Raw and Mackenzie Davis.

There are things in this episode that are rather atypical for Black Mirror, and not just the setting. There is kindness. There is joy. There is compassion. There is hope and optimism. All of this comes as a welcome relief, particularly after the harrowing “Shut Up and Dance” episode that preceded it, but there is still an ever-present worry, not created by the episode itself, but by us. After several episodes of rug-pulls and horrible twists and big reveals that make the characters’ lives immeasurably worse, it’s difficult to watch this happy couple as we wait nervously for the surely-inevitable Bad Thing to happen, hoping desperately that maybe, just this once, things will be alright in the end.

After 6 episodes of sadness and surprises which featured more nightmarish visions of the future while also breaking away from the formula the show established in its first two seasons, it feels like the show can do anything now, the possibilities are endless, which is an exciting prospect for the future of the series.

GAME OF THRONES – “Battle of the Bastards”/”The Winds of Winter”

game-of-thrones-6
Copyright: HBO.

The phenomenal fantasy finished its sixth season with a climactic battle and a finale that was quite possibly the best episode of the whole show.

Once again, the penultimate episode focussed on a big-budget bust-up in one area of the Seven Kingdoms, with a Messianic Jon Snow (Kit Harrington) facing off against the biggest of bastards Ramsay Bolton (Iwan Rheon) in a field near Winterfell. The location wasn’t quite as dramatic as previous skirmishes at the Wall or King’s Landing but it gave the episode a gritty, realistic feel and quickly became a muddy graveyard of vastly-outnumbered Night’s Watch members and Bolton soldiers.

Impressive direction from Miguel Sapochnik (who also directed the next episode, more on that in a bit) turned a show full of dragons and ice zombies into a medieval Saving Private Ryan with heart-stopping moments like Ramsay’s cruel hostage negotiation, the CGI-free shot of Jon facing a stampede of cavalry, or the claustrophobic first-person view of him struggling to escape a disturbingly-large pile of corpses as the Bolton army closes in.

Game of Thrones has produced some incredibly cinematic setpieces over the years but it’s outdone itself with this episode, which opens with Danaerys saving her city from a siege by unleashing her dragons on the unsuspecting attackers. It’s a thrilling scene which would be the standout highlight of a normal episode but it gets overshadowed by the gruelling, grounded intensity of the conflict that follows.

The season closed with “The Winds of Winter”, which was essentially 60 minutes of pure, concentrated pay-off. Every storyline in the series reached an emotional high-point and featured lots of satisfying surprises and scenes which we’ve been wanting to see for years, including a final image which the show has been building up to since its first episode.

The opening 20 minutes lead up to a moment I daren’t spoil and this section alone would have catapulted the episode to the top of the Best Episodes table, its slow build of tension and unease established from the very beginning by the small, simple idea to use piano in the soundtrack for the first time (that Ramin Djawadi, what a guy). The rest of the episode keeps up this high standard, delivering scene after scene of resolution, confrontation and, of course, death (this is Game of Thrones after all).

Even the cringe-worthy Dorne storyline got a promising development, as bitchy grandmother/secret best character Olenna Tyrell (Diana Rigg) sailed over to sort out the mess the Martells had made and give them some much-deserved mockery.

The stage is all set for Game of Thrones‘ final act. With just two shortened seasons left, the end is in sight and not many main characters have managed to get this far. Now to wait and see whether Westeros will be overrun by White Walkers or scorched by dragons, and who will sit on that damn Iron Throne, if there’s anyone with a pulse left by the last episode.

BETTER CALL SAUL – “Nailed”/”Klick”

better-call-saul-season-2
Copyright: AMC.

Better Call Saul is on track to equal or even surpass the show it spun-off from. Oh, did I say that last time? Well, it’s still true, especially after a season like this one which built on its first to give a compelling exploration of the fractious relationship between the McGill brothers, nudge Jimmy (Bob Odenkirk) further along his path to becoming Saul in a way that feels completely organic, and spend more time on its secret weapon Kim (Rhea Seehorn) who often reaps the consequences of Jimmy’s actions.

BCS is a patient, methodical show that is happy to take its sweet time with every scene but is rarely dull. It likes to play with how we see its characters, giving depth to those who seem one-dimensionally mean, revealing flaws in its good-ish guy protagonist, constantly changing how we view Chuck (Michael McKean), and making it clear that it’s not just Jimmy who’s different to his Bad self – Mike (Jonathan Banks) isn’t yet the ruthless hitman we meet in the original series.

We spend so much time seeing the everyday minutiae and silent inner struggles of these character’s lives that when something momentous does happen, it hits like a truck. One worrying scene in “Nailed” ends with a sound that made me recoil and cover my mouth in horror, and a disorienting, agonisingly-long take of a character being prodded and questioned by doctors while on a gurney is one of the most distressing scenes I’ve seen all year. The finale ends with one of those Important Conversations that are this show’s bread and butter, capped with a quiet click (or “Klick”, I suppose) that has the same impact as a gunshot.

The show also has a subtle silliness which appears in both Jimmy and Mike’s storylines. Though Mike tends to deal with grisly violence and action-heavy material, his old-codger weariness and blunt attitude provides more than a few laughs.

Saul‘s behind-the-scenes crew is made up of many of the same people who worked on Breaking Bad, which means that its writing, direction and music are all reliably high-quality. The references to its predecessor are still slipped in seamlessly and, excitingly, “Klick” heavily implies that a huge one is coming in season three.

SENSE8 – “A Christmas Special”

sense8-christmas
Copyright: Netflix.

Sneaking onto the list at the last minute is Sense8, which returned for a feature-length special this Christmas. Functioning as both a reintroduction to the series and a setup for season two, the special revealed what had happened to its psychically-linked characters over the last year.

The series has sometimes struggled with juggling its 8 very different storylines that follow characters in seperate parts of the world, each with their own supporting cast of other characters and varying wildly in tone and genre. However, this special expertly jumped between plots and gave everyone a significant moment in their own stories. It was just nice to spend time with these characters again after such a long absence. I didn’t realise how much I’d missed them.

The best part of Sense8 is when it uses its high-concept premise – 8 people born on the same day can communicate with each other telepathically, sharing emotions, knowledge and skills, even taking over each other’s bodies at will – to bring its characters together.

Masterfully-edited from gorgeous footage filmed several weeks apart at different locations on opposite ends of the globe, these scenes, whether they’re small conversations between two sensates struggling to work out what to do next or big show-stoppers like the birthday celebration, the fight, the Christmas Eve choir service and the scene where everyone, uh, comes together, are impressively well-executed and staggeringly ambitious.

No other show would even attempt most of this stuff, but the massive budget and creative freedom given to the Wachowskis by Netflix for their passion project allows them to do whatever they want. The results are stunning and often deeply moving.

There are dozens of highly-acclaimed shows nowadays which are dark or gritty or full of death, violence and despair, focussing on troubled protagonists with grim lives facing one crisis after another (e.g: well, every other entry on this list) and that’s fine in moderation but it can get a bit much.

Thank goodness, then, that a show as relentlessly optimistic and sentimental as Sense8 exists, a show where its diverse protagonists have a superpower that is basically extreme empathy, where every problem can be solved by teamwork, friendship, emotional support and the psychic equivalent of tag-team wrestling.

Even when its overly-earnest dialogue becomes mawkish, even when its efforts to connect and intertwine these storylines become confusing, it’s worth watching just because a show this bold, heartfelt, weird and so heavily focussed on the goodness in people and their potential to do great things together without race or gender or sexuality being an issue is sorely needed right now.

Honourable Mentions: The Night Of – “The Beach”, Veep – “Mother”, Stranger Things – “Holly, Jolly”, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt – “Kimmy Meets A Drunk Lady!”, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend – “When Will Josh and His Friend Leave Me Alone?”.

 

Thank you to everyone who’s read all of this and I hope you’ll stick around because I’m gonna keep this blog going and see what top TV 2017 brings.

2015’s Top TV: FARGO Season Two

(Image ©FX)

One of the biggest surprises of 2014 was that this seemingly-superfluous series based on a film from two decades ago was actually very, very good.

Under the guidance of showrunner Noah Hawley, the show impressively maintained the best qualities of the Oscar-winning film that shared its name, which had a memorable mixture of shocking violence, quirky mobsters, endearing characters, funny accents, ordinary people ending up in bad situations due to even worse decisions, and a light touch of the absurd and the mythical.

After being hailed with praise, the show returned with increased confidence and it was great fun to watch.

This season went back in time to explore a case Molly Solverson’s dad Lou worked on in 1979. The case was briefly discussed in season one and it sounded pretty horrific.

As the characters get into deeper trouble, costly mistakes are made, the body count begins to rise and Old Lou’s words rattle round our heads, there’s an increasingly strong feeling of inevitable doom, that the characters are unknowingly heading towards a place where Something Terrible is going to happen and any attempts to avoid what’s coming will fail miserably.

The second season of Fargo is a more complicated affair than its predecessor, doubling the amount of main characters, widening its scope, including more political and historical commentary and playfully experimenting with the way it tells its ‘true’ story.

Unlike that other critically-acclaimed miniseries that returned for a second season last year, it manages to juggle many things – more characters, more locations, more intertwining storylines, a new look and tone which is drastically different to the previous season but still keeps what people liked about the show in the first place, and a clear but subtle opinion on the state of the nation at the time – without falling flat on its face and becoming an unlikeable, overwrought mess.

Setting all of this up does make the first three episodes a bit slow, aside from a messy confrontation at a diner that sets the events of the season into motion. They lay the groundwork for even messier outbreaks of violence later on with plenty of exceptionally well-written conversations and typically-quirky character moments.

Then the pace builds, the stakes rise and the tension often becomes unbearable as the season races towards a grisly climax in Sioux Falls. The final episode is a long exhalation of breath, a calm epilogue which wraps up loose ends, mops up the blood and examines how the survivors are coping with what they’ve experienced.

The show has an exceptional cast and even the minor characters get a memorable scene in their limited screen time. Kirsten Dunst is especially good as highly-strung hairdresser Peggy Blomquist. She and her dopey, long-suffering husband Ed (Jesse Plemons) get caught in the middle of a confrontation between the mob and a local crime family that could escalate into all-out war.

To show this conflict, the season tries out new televisual tricks in the same gleeful manner of a child that just got a lot of new toys for Christmas, jumping into black and white, messing with the aspect ratio, changing the framing device of the narrative for an episode, inserting flashbacks without warning, doing a few inventive montages, adding in a freeze-frame or two and using a lot of split-screen.

But every visual flourish has clearly been carefully thought out and it rarely feels indulgent. It’s oddly exciting. You never really know quite what sort of rabbit the show’s gonna pull out of its hat next, since it delights in subverting expectations and trying new things, and this applies to the storytelling as well as the show’s beautiful visual style.

It’s also complemented by an eclectic soundtrack of period-appropriate ’70s music and new versions of songs from other Coen brothers films.

Though it would be best to watch the show in order, and even watch the film, if you have time,  before the show, it’s not at all necessary. Many of the references to the film in season one and references to season one in season two won’t affect your enjoyment of the show and most of them are fairly minor.

Well, apart from one scene at the end of the most recent season where the writers bend over backwards to nonsensically link the fate of one character to another from season one, which was a rare mis-step for the show. But don’t let that put you off.

Since Hannibal has sadly had its last meal and that other miniseries that was on my 2014 Best Of list has nosedived in quality, Fargo has become my favourite show on TV… and it’s taking a year off. Sigh. At least it gives you lot plenty of time to catch up!

Yes, sadly, season three won’t be on our screens until 2017. But will it be worth the wait?

Oh, you betcha.

One Year On

This Friday, the 10th of October, will be the one-year anniversary of this blog. Hooray!

This blog began as an excuse to go on at length about how good my favourite shows are without anyone being able to interrupt me (see: the Community and Doctor Who posts that have been so numerous that they now have their own categories) and to highlight the best new shows that have recently aired.

Well, that was the idea anyway, but I chose to make the first post on this blog about a promising new TV show called Agents of SHIELD, and it turned out to be complete rubbish. The show did, not the post. Well, maybe the post, too.

Luckily, every show that I’ve written about in the twenty-five posts since then has been rather good, and I’ve also had a look at a few classics that are no longer on the air, and plenty of shows that I’m still catching up on.

The updates aren’t quite as frequent as they were when this blog began, and there’s so much good telly on nowadays that a few of 2014’s biggest shows have passed me by (like True Detective and Fargo) but, when I do update, I hope that the posts are worth a read and that my lame attempts at humour provoke a chuckle or two.

Hopefully one of these blog entries causes you to check out a show which you’d never heard of before that ends up becoming one of your new favourites. Like Hannibal. Or Orphan Black. Or The Shield. Or Friday Night Lights.

Oddly, despite me being a Brit, most of the posts here are about American TV, only a few are about British shows, and even less are about British shows that don’t have ‘Doctor’ in the title. I’ll try to redress that balance in the next few months.

I’ll also keep trying to improve my writing. Another reason for starting this blog was to get better at articulating my thoughts and explaining why I hold certain opinions about something. So far, I think I have improved, and I’ve even managed to entertain a few people along the way.

After initially expecting this to be read by approximately zero people, it’s been a nice surprise to have received a few likes and a few comments – positive ones, even! – and over a dozen followers. Many thanks to all of you, hope you still like what you read and feel free to leave a comment to tell me what you think and what I’m doing right or wrong.

Future entries? Well, before the year is out,  I’ll be catching up on True Detective – it’s only 8 episodes, dunno why it’s taken me so long to get to it – and the Fargo miniseries. Also, since it was announced mere hours ago that Twin Peaks is returning in 2016, I think it’s time for me to finally crack open that boxset that’s been collecting dust on my shelf and see what all the fuss is about.

What else? Uh… actually, probably best not to plan too much. Usually when I try to plan ahead it doesn’t end well and long-promised posts never turn up, but I will actually do these ones, promise. And more!

Thanks for reading.

-Dan.

Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

shield 2

Three episodes in, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D is a disappointment. Setting a show in the aftermath of a a superhero-versus-aliens battle and focusing on the people who have to clean up the mess is a great idea. Looking at the reaction of everyday civilians to aliens and gods fighting in the streets, that’s fantastic. Unfortunately, there’s some rather big problems that’s stopping the show from being as good as it could be.

The biggest problem is the cast of characters. I don’t really care much about any of them. The S.H.I.E.L.D. plane could get smashed up by an angry Hulk* mid-flight, with Agent Coulson being the only survivor, and I wouldn’t bat an eyelid. Well, maybe I’d miss Fitz a little, I’ve liked him a bit since noticing that he named his little search robots after the seven dwarves from Snow White.

*(OK, slightly redundant -is there any other kind of Hulk?)

But, as a whole, the team isn’t very interesting, and that’s an issue when the first half of the episode is them trading quips and exposition with each other. If we don’t care about them, then half of every episode is just boring, talky build-up to the actual mission, rather than being any fun to watch.

There’s Skye, a ‘hacktivist’ who has a mysterious back-story (that’s one) and might be a double agent, but maybe not really. There’s Fitz and Simmons, two scientists who talk over each other with pseudo-scientific gobbledygook (though, to be fair, this was only a problem in the pilot, since then they haven’t done that as much) and walk a very thin line between annoyingly-quirky and endearingly-quirky. Which side they fall on changes on a scene-by-scene basis.

There’s that guy whose name I can’t remember, a top field agent with a mysterious back-story (that’s two) who acts as a lone wolf who doesn’t like working in a team. So, you would think, forcing him into a team would be interesting and exciting as sparks fly between him and his reluctant teammates. It’s not. Maybe because he doesn’t have any chemistry with any of his team. Or maybe it’s because he seems to have exactly one facial expression, which he used during the ‘big reveal’ of his tragic upbringing (talking about his brother beating him, while looking like he was thinking about what to have for lunch) and during a tense undercover mission (where he looked slightly confused, and like he was wondering what to have for lunch). It’s, well, it’s not great.

'Where am I? Who are these people? Steak, or fish and chips?'
‘Where am I? Who are these people? Steak, or fish and chips?’

There’s also Melinda May, a legendary field agent who decided to stay out of combat after an incident in her mysterious back-story (that’s three). She’s reluctantly returning to field work, but hasn’t been given a lot to do so far.

The one shining light in this fairly bland crew is Agent Coulson, coming back from the dead and generally being as cool and clever as he was in the Marvel movies. He thinks he’s returned after a quick resuscitation and some rest in Tahiti (It’s a magical place, apparently*), but the real circumstances of his return have been hidden from him. So, in other words, he has a mysterious back-story (that’s four!). Coulson’s great, but he alone can’t carry the whole show.

*Incidentally, if Tahiti’s Tourism Board don’t jump on this free publicity and change their slogan to ‘It’s a magical place!’, they’re missing a golden opportunity. An offhand mention on a TV show can do wonders for tourism. Belize was used as shorthand for murder on Breaking Bad but the tourism board still managed to use that to their advantage.

'I'll send you to Belize'
‘I’ll send you to Belize’

Gosh, this has been really negative so far. And on my first blog post, too. There’s still plenty to like about Agents. Like I said, Coulson is great, Fitz is okay and the other characters…well, there’s plenty of time for them to improve. The show’s been given a full 22-episode order, so by the end of the season finale this could be a great, fun hour of television. The show has clearly had a lot of money spent on it, so the special effects are fantastic and the action scenes are well-done, if a little cheesy. The Marvel universe allows for some really silly/cool stuff, like the scene in the last episode where an element that can control gravity went nuts, forcing Coulson to confront the scientist responsible for it on the floor, then the ceiling, then on the walls. More of that please. The Nick Fury cameo in the second episode was also a treat, a television version of the post-credits stinger used so often in the Marvel movies. Also, as of the end of the last episode, Coulson has accidentally created a supervillain that can mess with gravity, which could be AWESOME in future episodes.

So, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. has problems. There’s frequent dull patches and characters who we know so little about it’s difficult to care, especially when one of them can’t act (looking at you, Mr Lone Wolf). But there’s potential. A lot of potential. A few months from now, when the characters have developed more and the writers have noticed the reviews and the feedback and started fixing things, this could be wonderful. At the moment, I give it five more episodes, then I’m done watching.

P.S. Jesus, that’s a lot of text. If you’ve read this far, congratulations! The other posts won’t be this long, I promise. Well, probably. Maybe. Possibly…

2014 EDIT As it turns out, I lied. They will be this long.

Hello!

Hello, I’m Daniel. Welcome to my blog. I love television. I watch far too much of it really, and could ramble on about it for hours and hours. However, if I did, my friends would be bored to tears and possibly stop talking to me. So I started this blog, a collection of my thoughts, opinions, celebrations, concerns, rants and raves about TV, past and present. Mostly present.

Here I’ll be doing (hopefully) weekly posts about what’s on, and what’s long gone, what’s good and what to avoid at all costs. I hope you enjoy.

Incidentally, I’m not sure if anyone will actually read this. It’s entirely possible that this will basically be me talking to myself once a week. But if you are reading this and feel like leaving a comment or some feedback, please do!

-Dan